Social Care in Almshouses and Aged Miner Homes in the North East

Almshouses and ‘aged miner homes’ are still a common sight around the north east. But what’s their history? When did they originate? Who founded them and who owns them now? What were and are they like to live in?

In October’s talk, Christine Seal will look first at almshouses, giving examples of different types and their occupants, and then at the growth of aged miner homes in the north east from their inception in the 1890s to the 1930s, after which few were built.

AlmshouseTynemouuth

Tynemouth Master Mariner Almshouses

Our speaker

Christine researched the subject as part of a nationwide project conducted by the Family and Community Historical Research Society that culminated in a book to which she contributed a chapter on occupational almshouses in the north east. She had previously studied relief of the poor in the community for a PhD at the University of Leicester.

Among her many interests since her relocation to the north east is involvement with the conservation group of Hexham Abbey, where she is helping to record the abbey’s textiles and memorials. She is also secretary of the NE Methodist History Society.  As well as aged miner homes in Durham and Northumberland, Christine is currently researching stories of Methodism, local preachers and chapels in the north east.

Book now

Our  talk will take place on Wednesday 24 October at The Corner House, Heaton NE6 5RP at 7.30pm (Doors open at 7.00pm. You are advised to take your seat by 7.15pm). All welcome. FREE for Heaton History Group members. £2 for non-members. Please book your place by contacting maria@heatonhistorygroup.org / 07443 594154. Until 27 September, booking will be open to Heaton History Group members only.

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