Newcastle Hospitals: nine centuries of care

Our September talk will look at the development of hospitals in Newcastle from the 12th to 21st centuries, including the highly regarded and ground-breaking Freeman Hospital in High Heaton. The talk concludes with some observations on the past that should shape the future.

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St Mary the Virgin Hospital, 12th century

Our speaker

Reg Hall studied medicine at University College London and University College Hospital in London before spending a year at a mission hospital in what is now the Democratic Republic of Congo.

After completing surgical training, he was appointed as a consultant urologist in Newcastle. He went on to work with international cancer clinical trials organisations and established and directed the Northern Cancer Network. After retirement, he co-founded Cancer Connections, a cancer support charity in South Tyneside where he still volunteers.

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Newcastle Infirmary, 1753

Book now

Our talk will take place on Wednesday 25 September 2019 at The Corner House, Heaton NE6 5RP at 7.30pm (Doors open at 7.00pm. You are advised to take your seat by 7.15pm). All welcome. FREE for Heaton History Group members. £2 for non-members. Please book your place by contacting maria@heatonhistorygroup.org / 07443 594154.

1 thought on “Newcastle Hospitals: nine centuries of care

  1. Brenda Whatmore

    I seem to remember my Grandfather, William Shepherd (Cardigan Terrace and then Leyburn Drive, High Heaton), paid 1p (that’s an old penny) per week towards the hospital – I always thought it was for the RVI but not sure, He died when I was 19 in 1962 when he was 91years old. He was the father of George Shepherd who despite being confined to a wheelchair (born with polio and using mouth and feet to do beautiful copperplate writing with pencil) opened a Commercial School in Cardigan Terrace and then 218 Heaton Road – he took miners who had been hurt in the pit and he rehabilitated them, initially teaching Book keeping and Typewriting.

    Reply

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